Pritning a large canvas, the colour isn't the same of the file on screen?

Why is the machine...Roland verascamm sp300v printing a different colour from the file on the screen?

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Your screen is not calibrated! That is the most direct answer. Pay to have your monitor calibrated or print out a picture and adjust from there.  When doing other than pictures, you need to print out a color chart from your machine. That way you know a known value and can plug in the colors that you need. Of course that will not work with a picture, but you can easily adjust vector images.

I was never shown how to correctly set up the versacamm for printing.  How does having the monitor calibrated affect how it prints?  How can you tell if you selected the right colour profile?  How do colour charts help you?  Sorry for all these questions, but I've never been told or shown anything about this.  Thanks for any help you can provide.

Scott it would take me 8 hours on site to show you how much you are missing out on. You can check our video section and if you need a manual I can get you one for your machine if it is not in our section, but I will answer the questions you asked:

I was never shown how to correctly set up the versacamm-

Where did you get the machine from? They did not provide any training? You need training on the machine; versaworks; and graphic program!

How does having the monitor calibrated affect how it prints?  -

What you see on the monitor is a different color spectrum than what is produced by the printer / without printing and then interpreting what you see on the screen and what is produce by the printer means that you are merely guessing - I am by no means saying to calibrate your monitor or buy one of those $1000 ones, but a $200 monitor will not provide you a rendition of what you print 

How can you tell if you selected the right colour profile? 

Profiles are important, like really important - they set how the print head delivers ink; how the printer prepares the media to receive the ink and how it dries the ink (stops dot gain); the vacuum strength; the speed at which the media is fed into the machine, - All of these things affects the print and that is why you are getting a variance in results. 

How do colour charts help you? 

They help you by showing you all of the colors that your printer can produce - they provide a grid that when those colors are selected - that is what printed regardless of how it looks on the screen.

Those were your questions:

Mine are

What is the maintenance state of your machine

Was the bi-direction set

Was the calibration set

Did you do the print and cut adjustment

Did you do the crop cut adjustment

have you done a nozzle test and what is the state of it

Have you done a test cut, how is the force, how is the offset

So many things, but all of these things are taught on the 1st day of owning a VersaCAMM!

I am using Signlab to import the files, then exporting them as eps files to veraworks.  The colour management in versaworks in custom

dic_standard_colour (cmyk)

perceptual (raster)

preserve primary colours is checked

use embedded icc profile is checked

I did a lot of experimenting after I did a canvas for a photographer that had the black tux to out dark blue.  I ended up with these settings that have worked very well until the other day.  Did a black frame around what I thought was a dark grey sky.  It ended up being more blueish.  I export everything from signlab to versworks

I purchased the machine used.  I was given a bare bones tour of it.  Enough to get by.  The rest is trial & error.

Color management can be very tricky.

Your monitor needs to be adjusted and calibrated to display correctly. Then you need to apply the profile that you are using to print to the monitor to have it accurately show what your output would be. Most people do not know how to do this so they find a work around to get acceptable output. Keep in mind that the output will not look exactly like what is on the screen no matter how much you invest in time and equipment for your proofing setup. The monitor is RGB (usually sRGB output) and the printer is CMYK - Roland CMYK gamut to be specific and most simulations on your monitor will be SWOP CMYK.

Confused yet? Most of us are at this point. The trick is to maintain the graphic as close to its original settings as possible to get consistent output from the printer. What I mean by this is that many people tweak the graphic on their monitor and then use settings like max impact via versaworks and get very over saturated prints. 

Make sure you export your graphic using native for the color settings, then when you bring it into versaworks use the correct profile and Pre Press US for color management, and then perceptual for color rendering on the custom settings for the raster image.

I have a video link for you here - please do not share it on other forums etc. as it is a private link for a training that is part of our overall versacamm training, It goes over the basics of color management and setup. Hopefully this will help!

http://youtu.be/ESMsVQ9dxLw

I am using Signlab to import the files, then exporting them as eps files to veraworks.  The colour management in versaworks in custom

dic_standard_colour (cmyk)

perceptual (raster)

preserve primary colours is checked

use embedded icc profile is checked

I did a lot of experimenting after I did a canvas for a photographer that had the black tux to out dark blue.  I ended up with these settings that have worked very well until the other day.  Did a black frame around what I thought was a dark grey sky.  It ended up being more blueish.  I export everything from signlab to versworks

Try printing a small one - straight from the original image without the export - to see what you get then

Thank you Steve  your video helped me with an issue i been fighting with all day

Glad it helped!

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